kuneku​​ne pig​s at bf fa​​​​rm

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More Litters due April, May, July & August

For Sale
(417) 967-665​9

2021 Litter Schedule

Quality • Conformation • Diversity

We offer quality registered Kunekune breeding stock, focusing on exceptional conformation, larger size and faster growth rates for pork production. We also offer smaller sized KuneKu​​nes for the pet market.

We have one of the largest and most genetically diverse herd of KuneKunes, adding new lines all the time.

Boris • Whakanui • Wilsons Gina • Rebecca Gina • Rona • Tonganui • Aria Gina • Te Whangi • Andrew • Keropa • Mahia Love

KuneKune Pigs for Sale

Piglets now Available!

Contact Us  (417) 967-6659
Quality

Conformation

BF Farm located in the Heart of the Beautiful Ozark Mountains.  Our 240 ac. farm is dedicated to breeding the finest in KuneKune Pigs, Kiko Goats and Black Hereford Cattle.

Diversity

WHAT IS C​OI?

Coefficient of I​nbreeding is the most important factor when selecting a KuneKune Pig breeder.

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Some of our cu​rrent KunekuNe Piglets 

Gilt

This special girl is out of our Sow Reba & Boar Kordell

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Kune Piglet

Boar

This stunning boy is out of our Sow Karen & Boar Boris

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Gilt

This little cuttie is out of our Sow Kayla and Boar Elvis

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We sell our KuneKune Piglets and Pigs throughout the United Sta​tes

We are Currenly Shipping Our KuneKune Pigs and Piglets to the Following States & Territories

Alabama • Ala​ska • American Samoa • Arizona • Arkansas • California • Colorado • Connecticut • Delaware • District of Columbia • Florida • Georgia • Guam • Hawaii • Idaho • Illinois • Indiana • Iowa • Kansas • Kentucky • Louisiana • Maine • Maryland • Massachusetts • Michigan • Minnesota • Minor Outlying Islands • Mississippi • Missouri • Montana • Nebraska • Nevada • New Hampshire • New Jersey • New Mexico • New York • North Carolina • North Dakota • Northern Mariana Islands • Ohio • Oklahoma • Oregon • Pennsylvania • Puerto Rico • Rhode Island • South Carolina • South Dakota • Tennessee • Texas • U.S. Virgin Islands • Utah • Vermont • Virginia • Washington • West Virginia • Wisconsin • Wyoming  

We can  recommend several ground transporters that deliver our pigs safely and inexpensively.
Useful Links
American Kunekune Pig Registry American Kunekune Pig Society The British Kunekune Pig Society

BF FARM FEATURED ARTICLE IN RURAL MISSOURI MAGAZINE

Rural Missouri story about our KuneKune Pigs
KuneKune Pigs are a excellent option for a mult species rotationl grazing program
- Rural Missouri
Our Farm about KuneKune pigs Featured in Rural Missouri

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Keep up to date on upcoming and current litters.

What we like to feed the herd during the winter months.


We like to feed grain and would recommend 1-3qt scoop like we have (see the pic below) filled to that top line/back part of the scoop for the 3 of them 2x a day. You can divid e it out into their feed bowls. It is also okay to pour it on the ground. It seems to work best if you put 1 more pile of food than you have pigs (so at least 4 piles for your 3 piglets).

 

They will be able to graze on their favorite grass & weeds soon. You can also supplement with fruit & vegetable scraps from cutoffs, peels, or leftovers from dinner. Sometimes a local grocer will let you have “uglies” for free that they are going to throw out. If there are any fruits with a pit (like a peach, plum, etc) be sure to take it out, because they could get a blockage. The only thing I can think of not to give them is an avocado. It is supposed to be toxic, especially the pit. Our pigs never really cared for any kind of citrus. They especially love watermelon or any other type of melons, carrots, bananas (even the peel with no stickers), apples, sweet potatoes, & their favorite is pumpkin.

 

All pigs are different like us. It also depends on how much exercise & how much room they have to move around & explore. If they start looking too fat with their bellies almost touching the ground, cut back a little. If they look too thin or you can feel their backbone, feed them a little more.

 

BF FARM FEATURED ARTICLE IN H​OBBY FARMS MAGAZINE

BF Farm in Huggins, Missouri, is owned ​and operated by Mark Bengston and Jodey Fulcher. They are top-notch breeders of Black Hereford cattle, Kiko goats and Kunekune pigs. All three species enjoy rotational grazing through pastures at BF Farm.

Our Farm

240 acres, three species of livestock, 14,000 feet of goat fencing and 23 gates. It’s all for a sustainable grazing technique managed by two ded​icated and knowledgeable farmers, working a rotational grazing formula that makes for an innovative and successful livestock venture. BF Farm in Huggins, Missouri, is owned and operated by Mark Bengston and Jodey Fulcher. They are top-notch breeders of Black Hereford cattle, Kiko goats and Kunekune pigs. All three species enjoy rotational grazing through pastures at BF Farm. Mark and Jodey have found an approach that maximizes food availability, reduces parasite risk and promotes health for each animal while effectively managing the natural resources of the land. While Mark grew up in New Jersey and had never farmed before, Jodey grew up in Georgia and spent summers learning and working on his grandparents’ farm. An uncle gave Jodey his first goat a Saanen buck that had been won in a poker game—and his grandfather got him started with chickens.Jodey’s early farming experiences influenced the choices he made starting a small farm with Mark.

BF FARM FEATURED ARTICLE

The Fence Post article about raising KuneKune Pigs

Texas County livestock breeders utilize innovative grazing technique

It’s like a livestock triple-threat or a grazing trifecta.At BF Farm in Huggins, Mo., owners Mark Bengtson and Jodey Fulcher are breeders of Black Hereford cattle, Kiko goats and Kunekune pigs.They use a grazing regimen involving all three species taking turns working over the same space.

Mark Bengtson of BF Farm KuneKunes,  interviewed about the use of the KuneKune Pig breed as part of a multi species rotational grazing system developed at BF Farm

Rural TV interview about our KuneKune Pigs

BF FARM FEATURED ARTICLE

Houston Herald article about our KuneKune Pigs

PARTNERSHIP IN THE PASTURE
Texas County livestock breeders utilize innovative grazing technique

At BF Farm in Huggins, owners Mark Bengtson and Jodey Fulcher are breeders of Black Hereford cattle, Kiko goats and Kunekune pigs. They use a grazing regimen involving all three species taking turns working over the same space.The technique is particularly effective because of what the three species like to eat. The Kunekune (pronounced “cooney cooney”) is a small breed of pig native to New Zealand renowned for being an effective method of maintaining, managing or eradicating unwanted pasture weeds. Meanwhile, goats are well known for voluntarily munching on larger undesirable plants (like multiflora rose, knapweed, ironweed and more), while cattle, of course, prefer eating grass.

Register​ing your KuneKunes

There are two separate Kunekune breed registries- the American Kunekune Pig Registry and the American Kunekune Pig Society. Breeders can register with one, or with both. Pigs can be registered with one registry and transferred to the other, and pigs can be dual registered. As of July 1, 2020 AKPR won’t accept the registration or transfer of unwattled pigs into their herd book.

Featured Article

A NATURAL FARMING APPROACH—AND A FEAST FOR THE ANIMALS 

Rotational grazing is particularly effective because of what the three species like to eat. The kunekune (pronounced “cooney cooney”) is a small pig breed native to New Zealand and renowned for helping manage and eradicate unwanted pasture weeds—a delicacy for the pigs. For their part, such as multiflora rose, knapweed, and ironweed. “The goats prefer a woody forage and the pigs prefer a weedy forage,” Mark says, “And the cattle, of course, like grass. Each one of these species has different needs and wants in the fields, so they complement each other well.”The result is a more uniform pasture, because more plants are involved in the grazing. And with undesirable plants being eaten up regularly, there’s no need to spray pastures with herbicide.The kiko goats, which are also native to New Zealand, do a particularly good job in managing invasive plants, as they help control what grows in difficult areas, like steep hills or banks, Mark says.