the kunekune pig

 

We rotate our pigs through nine pas­tures, moving them every time we rotate our goats dur­ing the Spring and Summer. Depending on the quality and quantity of pasture available you​ may need to supplement. We supplement our pigs with soy meal mostly in the  Winter

For grain I would recommend 1-3qt scoop like we have filled to that top line/back part of the scoop for the 3 of them 2x a day. You can divide it out into their feed bowls. It is also okay to pour it on the ground. It seems to work best if you put 1 more pile of food than you have pigs (so at least 4 piles for your 3 piglets). They will be able to graze on their favorite grass & weeds soon. You can also supplement with fruit & vegetable scraps from cutoffs, peels, or leftovers from dinner. Sometimes a local grocer will let you have “uglies” for free that they are going to throw out. If there are any fruits with a pit (like a peach, plum, etc) be sure to take it out, because they could get a blockage. The only thing I can think of not to give them is an avocado. It is supposed to be toxic, especially the pit. Our pigs never really cared for any kind of citrus. They especially love watermelon or any other type of melons, carrots, bananas (even the peel with no stickers), apples, sweet potatoes, & their favorite is pumpkin. All pigs are different like us. It also depends on how much exercise & how much room they have to move around & explore. If they start looking too fat with their bellies almost touching the ground, cut back a little. If they look too thin or you can feel their backbone, feed them a little more.

This is the biggest mystery of all!  Feeding KuneKunes varies so much because of temperature, humidity and stage of production.   A good rule of thumb is again to ask your breeder and then to go by the body condition of your pig.  If they are getting too plump, cut the feed back a little.  If you are seeing that your pig is on the thin side…add a little more.  A healthy Kunekune usually needs 2-3% of its body weight in feed, daily plus free choice hay/grass.  Nursing sows could require 25-50% feed increase to accommodate feeding her piglets

More on Winter Feeding
We like to feed grain and would recommend 1-3qt scoop like we have (see the pic below) filled to that top line/back part of the scoop for the 3 of them 2x a day. You can divide it out into their feed bowls. It is also okay to pour it on the ground. It seems to work best if you put 1 more pile of food than you have pigs (so at least 4 piles for your 3 piglets). They will be able to graze on their favorite grass & weeds soon. You can also supplement with fruit & vegetable scraps from cutoffs, peels, or leftovers from dinner. Sometimes a local grocer will let you have “uglies” for free that they are going to throw out. If there are any fruits with a pit (like a peach, plum, etc) be sure to take it out, because they could get a blockage. The only thing I can think of not to give them is an avocado. It is supposed to be toxic, especially the pit. Our pigs never really cared for any kind of citrus. They especially love watermelon or any other type of melons, carrots, bananas (even the peel with no stickers), apples, sweet potatoes, & their favorite is pumpkin. All pigs are different like us. It also depends on how much exercise & how much room they have to move around & explore. If they start looking too fat with their bellies almost touching the ground, cut back a little. If they look too thin or you can feel their backbone, feed them a little more.